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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 1-6

Ethnoveterinary practices among small-holder goat farmers in Ogun State, Nigeria


1 Agricultural Media Resources and Extension Centre, Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria
2 Department of Agricultural Extension and Rural Development, Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria
3 Department of Animal Nutrition, College of Animal of Science and Livestock Production, Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria
4 Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Parasitology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. O T Irekhore
Department of Animal Nutrition, College of Animal of Science and Livestock Production, Federal University of Agriculture, P.M.B. 2240, Abeokuta, Ogun State
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/MTSP.MTSP_11_20

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Objective: Challenges of diseases and inadequate healthcare skills limit productivity of livestock while dearth of qualified veterinarians in rural communities have encouraged ethno-veterinary practices by small-holder farmers. Prevalent goat diseases and the practice and perception of ethno-veterinary activities among small-holder goat farmers were evaluated in Yewa North Local Government Area, Ogun State, Nigeria. Material and Methods: Data were drawn from 110 goat farmers (selected through multistage sampling technique) using Interview guide. Data obtained were analysed using descriptive statistics, Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficient and Chi Square analyses. Results showed that respondents mean age, farming experience and average herd size were 63 years, 21.5 years and 15 goats, respectively. All the farmers reared the West African Dwarf breed of goat. Parent stocks were mainly sourced from fellow farmers (95.5%) and most of the farmers keep goats for economic benefits (93.6%). Results: Common diseases that farmers observe in the goats were mange, ecthyma, peste des petits ruminants, and foot rot. Result indicated that farmers largely (81.8%) adopted ethno-veterinary practices in goats disease control and adoption of these practices was due to poor access to professional veterinary doctors (x̄=4.36, SD±0.89), ease of sourcing medicinal plants and herbs (x̄=4.16, SD±1.12), and cost effectiveness (x̄ =3.44, SD±1.21). Farming experience and herd size had significant association with farmers' perception of ethno-veterinary practice. Source of information did not influence farmers' perception on ethno-veterinary practices. Conclusion: Respondents preferred ethno-veterinary method in control of goat diseases and there is need for increased extension and veterinary interventions.


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